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Nintendo Wii VC Monday: Do You C What I C Edition
Three classic games now available for download.
By Andrew Joy 02/23/2009 13:01:30 PST

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INTERNATIONAL KARATE

When Nintendo unveiled last week's Virtual Console and WiiWare updates, it also announced that something of a surprise would be headed to the Wii Shop Channel. Though they didn't outright reveal, they did leave a trail of breadcrumbs that internet sleuths quickly followed, apparently revealing that Commodore 64 titles would soon be among the downloadable titles available for the Nintendo Wii. Only this week, however, did we get our confirmation, as today's additions include three C64 titles. Among them, players can now download The Last Ninja (an action adventure game), INTERNATIONAL KARATE (a two-player fighting game) and Pitstop II (a two-player racing game), each for 500 Wii Points. The official descriptions, as well as a list of all the clues in last week's announcement, can be found below:

The Last Ninja™ (Commodore 64, 1 player, Rated E10+ for Everyone 10 and Older—Animated Blood, Mild Violence, 500 Wii Points): The evil Shogun Kunitoki has long envied the powers of the Ninja brotherhood and would do anything to acquire their knowledge. To this end, he has sworn an oath to their total destruction. Once every decade, all Ninja must travel to the Island of Lin Fen, where they pay homage to the Shrine of the White Ninja and receive further teachings from the Koga Scrolls. Seizing the opportunity, Kunitoki summoned forth all the spirits from the depths of the Nether World and flung their full force against the amassed Ninja. None escaped the wrath of Kunitoki. Word of this unnatural disaster soon reached Armakuni, the last Ninja. Gathering all his courage, he has sworn to wreak a terrible revenge on the Shogun and all his followers. What unforeseen hazards await him?

INTERNATIONAL KARATE™ (Commodore 64, 1-2 players, Rated E10+ for Everyone 10 and Older—Mild Violence, 500 Wii Points): INTERNATIONAL KARATE is a simulation of a karate tournament in which one person can play against the computer or two players can compete against each other. During the game, you'll fly to various locations around the world. In all stages of the game, a wise old judge will watch over you and award you either a half-point or a full point, depending on how successful a hit has been.

Pitstop II™ (Commodore 64, 1-2 players, Rated E for Everyone, 500 Wii Points): Pitstop II was the first game that brought serious auto racing action to the computer screen—the thrill of battling an opponent, the excitement of fighting for the lead out on the track, and the suspense of struggling to be the first out of the pits. Third-person graphics and a split-screen display allow one or two players to experience the challenge of car racing head-to-head. Six of the world's toughest tracks are waiting, from Brands Hatch and its hairpin turns to the mile-long straight of Vallelunga. You can practice against the computer, but nothing will compare to the fun of racing against another person. Indeed, Pitstop II proves that car racing was never meant to be a solo sport.

As promised, here's a list of the Commodore 64-related clues that were embedded in last week's newsletter:

  • In the second paragraph, each sentence contains exactly 64 letters and numbers (not counting spaces or punctuation).
  • U.S. Route 64 runs from Arizona to North Carolina.
  • The third sentence ends with a comma and the word "door," hinting at the name Commodore.
  • "Brick House" was a hit for R&B group The Commodores.
  • The athletic teams of Vanderbilt University are known as the Commodores.
  • Pennsylvania's Route 286 passes through a town called Commodore.
  • The phrases "birthday greetings" and "who could ask for more?" are found in the classic Beatles tune "When I'm 64."

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